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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
in detroit, protecting the pensions of people attacked by a financial manager. they were affected by the changes of what took place in detroit. they've been spending a lot of time trying to straighten that out. >> a reminder 50 years ago this was a march for jobs and freedom, organized largely by a. phillip randolph, the great labor leader and the issue of union rights, labor rights, workers rights has always been deeply interconnected with civil rights in this country. >> there's no question about it. the unions are a little nervous as this continuing attack on collective bargaining, continual attack and the introduction of legislation in right to work states, this is being introduced. local elections are taking ahold and attacking workers and depressing wages. this is a big part of what afsme has been focusing on. they're at the pinnacle of the fight right now of what's going on in michigan. >> it's almost impossible to imagine how we can talk about closing a racial inequality gap without also talking at the exact same time about the economic equality that is so critical in our
is focusing on detroit. a city that is gone through incredible pain. and this is an opportunity for those of us who believe this is the greatest country in the world for people to have the opportunity to become all that they can be. we can go to detroit and it's a city where we which party has run that city for the past 50 years and we can propose different solutions, solutions . sed on our free enterprise strongly encouraging enterprise zones in detroit but we need ideas. anyone want to talk to us about detroit, that's where we think is one of the most important places to have an impact and to share in the cause that each of us believe. it's an honor to be with you all to share some words. i appreciate the opportunity. and god bless you. god bless america. thank you. >> thank you. now we will hear from mr. bob woodson sr., founder and president for the center of america.integrated >> good afternoon. the dr. king i remember was a man who was not content with reflecting the majority opinion or the consensus of the majority but he challenged it. we forget that the civil rights movement was
it in ohio, detroit, pennsylvania. >> they're doing it in texas. >> it would create jobs. so many opportunities for all americans. there is your answer. >> i want to add one point. i lived in atlanta. the day i arrived in atlanta, my first day on the air i got a call from maynar, d jackson. i got to know andrew young, josea williams. martin luther king's driver. i got to know these guys. what they did many the face of such hostility is an amazing profile in courage. what they did made this country better. >> absolutely. >> the president gave a good speech today, bob. one of the best speeches i have heard him give. >> talk about entitlements. unfortunately president obama has only expanded entitlements to make whites, blacks, hispanics more dependent. it's not helping anybody. you and i know more could be done in washington, d.c. it's cultural. when you have a president who is -- i know you don't like him. i don't like what he does. h's a good father, appearingly a good husband. there are no sex scandals. he's there for his kids. his pants are pulled up. he speaks gramattic -- corr
was edith lee payne who was there 50 years ago as well. the detroit woman who was as a child seen in this iconic 1963 photo reflected on both events. >> why was it important to be here? >> because my mother brought me. and if we're going to continue to make change and make this world better, we have to be a part of that change. >> reporter: the thousands that showed up battled rain, humidity and long security lines, but they stayed to honor the freedom marchers of 50 years ago. john and diana? >> tahman, thank you. >> tough to navigate. president obama opening his mouth and getting some people annoyed. other people saying great. he really had to please a lot of people with the speech. a tough one. >> yeah, some say he went too political. other people said he didn't go political enough. such a great platform for him to become more political. one of the things he said that i thought was interesting, he said america still has unfinished business and has to do with the doors of opportunity not just being cracked open for a few but being completely open for everyone, black, white, nati
to discussions in the black study center. paul kuntzler was born in detroit, michigan, in 1941 and raised at grosse pointe there before moving to washington, d.c. in 1951, he was active with the michigan young democrats and the congress on racial he called it. he credits john f. kinney as a major influence on his political consciousness. iin december 19 city with a move to washington, d.c. just days before his 20th birthday. he attended both the northern virginia center of the university of virginia and george mason university. for 32 years he was on the senior staff of the national science speakers association as assistant executive director for advertising exhibits an exhibitor workshops. in 1962, he was elected to the board of directors of the society of washington, the districts first gay-rights group. on april 17, 1965, he was one of 10 people in the world's first gay-rights picket in front of the white house. he is also one of the founders of the gay and lesbian activists alliance. he has an incredible memory are displayed by his tendency to recall events not just by the day but dow
of this country with something similar to what's happened in detroit. so just the fact that you're for obama care and the government taking care of us from cradle to grave, it doesn't mean anything if you can't pay for it. we're running out of steam and running out of ability to pay for this. >> if there were no affordable care act, 30 million or maybe more americans would have no health insurance. you got to do something about that, right? >> well, yes, it's a complicated problem because of how it was messed up. i was raised in a family of five in a depression of world war ii. they never had insurance. nobody went without insurance. but it's the system that has been created by government intervention that makes people do this. the whole idea of how you get a tax deduction, you know, the fact that big corporations can get a tax deduction, they can give medical care to the people but if you are independent or a small business owner, you are excluded. so you want to get rid of the hindrances and just not dwell on what are the complications when you get rid of all the bad things the government has b
, the stench of his blood was in the air. the big march in detroit, the week later. of course, the birmingham monday less than a month later. then kennedy. there was a season of tumultuous uprising in our country and a lot of bloodshed along the way and a lot of fear. >> and that issue of where the vines was coming from and who should fear the violence. i'll talk to you for a moment. i have something i would like us to listen to. on meet the press, roy wilkins being asked about the likelihood that it would be marchers who would riot. let's take a listen. >> mr. wilkins, there are a great many people, as i'm sure you know, that believe it would be impossible to bring more than 100,000 militant negroes into washington without incidence and possibly riot. >> i don't think there will be any rioting. i don't think a hundred thousand people, just assembling, is cause for apprehension about a riot. the city of washington has accommodated much larger crowds and nobody has talked up in advance the possibility of violence. >> so as you just pointed out, all of the violence up to this moment had been ag
we created a rainy day fund. i bet detroit wishes we had done what we had done in those years. putting billions dollars aside. those are things i worked with the mayor on and i'm proud of. but i don't agree with the mayor on everything. two years ago when he wanted to lay off 4,100 school teachers, all of my democratic opponents, they opposed that, like i did, but i'm the person who got those layoffs stops, and more recently, when the mayor wanted to put in place a homeless policy that i think quite frankly was cruel, i stopped it from happening by going to court. so when i can agree and work with the mayor or anybody quite frankly, i'm going to do it. when i can't, i'm not going to. i think the idea of having a government where you have to agree all the time or never, we have a place like that. it's called washington. and nothing happens. >> kind of a boutique issue in new york with the carriage horses. overall, there's a group for everything. >> you have a carriage horse actually. >> yes, i do. anyhow, that's a different story. there's a group called quinn hates animals. so
on washington, d.c. at least two tour buss collided on their way to this event. they were coming from detroit and crashed. they were almost there. 7 to 8 people hurt. we are keeping an eye on it. >> we will get more information. >> this major story army major nadal hassan found guilty on all counts. he faces the death penalty for killing 13 people when he injured others. he said this on fox and friends. >> what was really relieving is it took four years to come to this point and when survivors are talking about this, we talked about the need for justice to be served and when we saw the verdict come down, it meant a whole lot to us. all 13 jurors must vote for excuse or he will get the rest of his life in prison. and an 8-year-old girl fights off a would-be kidnapper in her backyard. >> she bit down on the man's hand and she kicked him and when she broke free ran into the neighbor's side door. >> the kidnapping attempt caught on a neighbor's surveillance camera. >> authorities are warning families to be extra vigilant. >> it was monkey see monkey do. little girl making friends with this gorill
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)